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National Human Trafficking Hotline

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0800 222 777 Report Line South Africa

0800 222 777 Report Line South Africa

 

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24/7. Confidential. Free.


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Report TraffickingCall Now

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HUMAN TRAFFICKING


WE CAN HELP

Are you a victim of human trafficking? Do you have information about a potential trafficking situation?

0800
222 777

 

Call

 

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What is human trafficking?

Human trafficking is the illegal trade of people for the purposes of forced labour and sexual exploitation.

As the world’s fastest growing criminal industry, it affects every nation across the globe, and is also defined as modern-slavery.

It’s the illegal trade of human beings. It’s the recruitment, control, and use of people for their bodies and for their labour. Through force, fraud, and coercion, people everywhere are being bought and sold against their will – right now in the 21st century.

But phrases like ‘slavery’ and ‘human trafficking’ can still feel ambiguous. This is the reality: slavery is control. It’s physical, verbal, and sexual abuse. It’s forced prostitution. It’s barbaric work conditions.
     

Act, Means, Purpose Chain
The existence of these three elements
constitute the crime of Human Trafficking

* "A-M-P MODEL" https://humantraffickinghotline.org/
sites/default/files/AMP%20Model.pdf

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Sex Trafficking

Sex
Trafficking
  

Forced Labour

Forced
Labour
  

Bonded Labour

Bonded
Labour
  

Domestic Servitude

Domestic
Servitude
   

Child Soldiers

Child
Soldiers
 

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Forced Begging

Forced
Begging
  

Forced Organ Removal

Forced
Organ
Removal 
  

Forced & Early Marriages

Forced
& Early
Marriages
  

Forced Adoption

Forced
Adoption
  

Baby Harvesting

Baby
Harvesting

 

 

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Sex Trafficking

Sex
Trafficking
  

Forced Labour

Forced
Labour
  

Bonded Labour

Bonded
Labour
  

Domestic Servitude

Domestic
Servitude
   

Child Soldiers

Child
Soldiers
 

Forced Begging

Forced
Begging
  

Forced Organ Removal

Forced
Organ
Removal 
  

Forced & Early Marriages

Forced
& Early
Marriages
  

Forced Adoption

Forced
Adoption
  

Baby Harvesting

Baby
Harvesting

 

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WE CAN HELP

Are you a victim of human trafficking? Do you have information about a potential trafficking situation?

0800 222 777

 

Call

 

Report

  

SOUTH AFRICA

  
South Africa


South Africa is a source, transit, and destination country for victims of trafficking. Our country has become a prime destination for international trafficking syndicates to operate.

There are a few main approaches traffickers use to lure victims:

False job offers, for jobs both in and outside of South Africa. When the person arrives, they find that the conditions are different from the ones advertised in the job offer – Often the victim’s ID is taken away, and they are forced into labour or sexual exploitation.

Loverboy – the trafficker courts the victim and pretends to be falling in love with them. Once he earns the victim’s trust, he sells them to be sexually exploited.

The Internet, mainly social networking sites, is a commonly used tool by traffickers for research and selection of potential victims.

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Human Trafficking is
the fastest growing crime
in the world.  

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"The first time I called the hotline, I immediately knew that I could trust them."


Survivor

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"The first time I called the hotline, I immediately knew that I could trust them."


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About Us  Email Us

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0800222777 is the South African National Human Trafficking Hotline, working in partnership with service providers nationally.

The National Hotline takes calls 24/7. Call Specialists are specially trained professionals, who follow international procedures ensuring the fastest response to each case. The Hotline works in close partnership with many stakeholders to ensure rapid response and effectiveness. The Hotline can connect you with training service providers for government institutions, hospitals, schools and universities, non-profits, etc.

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How it works

How it works

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1. A victim or witness calls the hotline. 2. An operator responds, records details, and transfers to law enforcement if there's immediate danger.

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How it works

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3. Our team checks the tip against our database to form a case. 4. We pass our report to law enforcement for investigation

  

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How it works

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5. Police conduct the raid that rescues the victim. 6. Victim is referred to our care.

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How it works

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PROTECT YOURSELF


As you travel, work, or use the internet, it is vital to be aware of modern-day slavery, and to know how to stay safe.

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Click on the titles listed to learn more about important information on protecting yourself & download the informational flyer here. ▸
  

Here are a few things you can do to make sure you don't become a victim of labour trafficking when you plan to apply for a job abroad:

+  Confirm that the organisation offering the job is licensed.

+  Have a working visa — tourist and other types of visas do not allow you to work abroad.

+  The work contract should always be bilingual — in a language you speak fluently, as well as in the official language of the country where you plan to work.

+  Never sign a contract written in a language you don't know well. Check the contract carefully for all the details about the working conditions. Don't sign a contract that has unclear or really general statements.

+  Keep contact details with you of the organization that handles foreign national issues, as well as the embassy/consulate in the country you are going to.

+  Give your family/friends detailed information on where you are going and staying, as well as a recent photo of you and the people you are travelling with.

+  Prepare all documents you will need and make copies.

+  Never give your ID to anyone. Always carry it with you.

+  Set an emergency signal with your relatives/friends, which you can use in case of emergencies.

+  Keep a small amount of money with you at all times incase of emergencies.

+  Learn some phrases in the language of the country you are visiting. Make sure you know how to ask for directions, and where to find the closest hospital or police station.

Travels are usually a source of positive emotions, especially when you are going on vacation, but at the same time it is a risky situation because you leave your home and go to a foreign territory with people you don’t know. Often, because of this vulnerability, travellers become victim of crimes, and sometimes trafficking.

+  Always keep contacts of organizations that handle foreign nationals issues, as well as the Embassy/Consulate within the country you are visiting.

+  Provide your family/friends with:

  • Detailed information on your travel itinerary.
  • Copies of your travelling documents and passport.
  • Recent photo of yourself and the people you are travelling with.

+  Set an emergency signal with your relatives/friends, which you can use in case of emergencies.

+  Prepare all documents you will need and make copies.

+  Never give your ID to anyone. Always carry it with you.

+  Be careful and keep your eyes open for suspicious activities near you. Inform your relatives/friends in case you see or hear something.

+  Keep a small amount of money with you at all times in case of emergencies.

+  Learn some phrases in the language of the country you are visiting. Make sure you know how to ask for directions, and know where to find the closest hospital or police station. Memorize the telephone number of at least one relative/friend.

+  Make sure you know the emergency code in the country.

+  Be careful and cautious when talking to strangers. Never share your whole name or where you are staying. If you think someone is following you, immediately head to a more populated area and don’t hesitate to call the police.

+  Avoid:

  • Travelling alone, at night or in dark alleys.
  • Getting into cars with people you don’t know.
  • Accepting food or drinks from people you don’t know.
  • Risky situations.
Very often, traffickers find their victims on the internet. Because everyone is free to create his/her profile, the identity of the users and the credibility of the information they publish is rarely guaranteed. Children and teenagers are specifically in danger of becoming victims of trafficking over the internet, since they are more vulnerable and less experienced. This is why we prepared a list of good advice for safe online activity:


+  If you decide to go on a date with someone you met online, remember that this is a high-risk situation, so you need to take some precautions. This might mean meeting with the person at daylight in a busy, central place, where nobody can abduct or hurt you. If the other person wants to meet in an apartment, at a dark or secluded place, or a park, this is a red flag that the person might be very dangerous.

+  When meeting someone off the internet, tell a friend, a relative, a colleague or someone who you can trust. It’s a good idea to have a safety plan in mind in case something goes wrong - for example, have the one you trust call you and come up with a code word if you need him/her to come pick you up (or insinuate that you have to leave right away).

+  Never give your personal ID, address, phone number, name, address of your school/university, or information about your relatives and family members to strangers or people you met online and don’t know very well.

+  Do not open messages with vulgar, inappropriate, dangerous or insulting content. Block users who send messages like these.

+  Never send pictures to people you just met online. Restrict the visibility options of your photos and the information you publish online to only close friends.

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0800 222 777

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Report   

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If you suspect it,
report it.

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Learn More

 

What can I do?


Speak with an operator who will answer any specific question. Click below to learn more about identifying human trafficking.

Download the flyer ▸

 

Call 0800 222 777 to speak with a Call Specialist who can answer any specific questions you might have.

– Evidence of being controlled: the person is accompanied by a controlling person, and does not speak on their own behalf. The person is transported to or from work; lives and works at the same place and is rarely allowed in public.

– Lack of control over personal schedule: the person is not able to move freely or leave a job. For example a woman who works 24/7, sees an unusual number of clients and has no time for herself.

– Lack of control over money: the person is not able to keep the money earned. It is “withheld for safe-keeping”. Most of the time the person owes debts to the employer.

– The person recently arrived in the country: they often don't speak the language, or only knows words related to their work.

– Fear, depression and overly submissive behaviour: the person is frightened to talk to outsiders and authorities as a result of threats.

– Poor health: Malnutrition or serious medical or dental problems. Sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, pelvic pain and traumas, urinary difficulties, pregnancy resulting from rape and prostitution, infertility from chronic untreated STDs and unsafe abortions.

– Bruises, scars and other signs of physical abuse and torture: although, sex trafficked victims are often beaten in areas that won't damage their appearance, like their lower back.

– Substance abuse problems or addictions: the person is often coerced into drug use by his/her traffickers or turn to substance abuse to help cope with his/her dreadful situation.

– What type of work do you do?

– Are you getting paid to do your job? Do you actually receive payment or is your money being held for you?

– Can you come and go as you please? Are you supervised when you are in public places?

– How do you feel about the police?

– Have you been threatened if you try to leave? Have you or your family been threatened?

– Have you been physically harmed in anyway?

– Have you ever been deprived of food, water, sleep or medical care?

– Do you have to ask permission to eat, sleep or go to the bathroom?

– Are you physically restrained in any way? Are there locks or doors preventing you from leaving?

– Has your identification or documentation been taken from you?

– Is anyone forcing you to do anything that you do not want to do?

Learn More about Job Safety ▸

– Many victims have a strong sense of distrust, and often do not speak the language of the country.

– Before questioning a person who may be a victim, try to separate the person from the individual accompanying her/ him, even if they are their spouse or family member. This individual could be the trafficker or controller.

– Evidence of possible "Stockholm" syndrome, where victims over time, become sympathetic to their captors.

 
In the case of child trafficking:

LOOK FOR:

– Child who does not trust adults.

– Child who is afraid of being deported by authorities.

– Child who seems to act inappropriately towards male adults.

– Child who has a cell phone despite a lack of other basic belongings.

– Child who travels alone or with a group of children accompanied by one adult who seems to guard them.

 

ASK QUESTIONS, making sure that the child is approached in a manner that reflects his/her age, development, culture, and language.

– Why did you come to (country’s name)?

– Do you have any papers? Who has them?

– Are you in school? Are you working? Can you leave if you want?

– Where do you live? Who else lives there? Are you scared to leave?

– Has anybody ever threatened you or your family, to keep you from running away?

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Services


The 0800222777 National Human Trafficking Hotline Line offers a variety of services. Click below to find out more.

Download the flyer ▸

 

Through our partner referral database the hotline helps connect callers to human trafficking service providers.

The hotline provides access to emergency, transitional, and long-term social services for victims and survivors of human trafficking. Examples of service referrals include case management, shelter, transportation, legal services, mental health and counseling services, and much more.

We offer training and technical assistance to law enforcement, medical professionals, airport staff, government agencies and other practitioners. Alternatively, we refer to government departments or organisations in your province. Through partnerships we aim to strengthen local and national structures and protocols to improve the nationwide response to human trafficking as a united front.

Call Specialists are available 24/7 to take reports of potential human trafficking. All reports are confidential and you may remain anonymous.

Our Call Specialists provide assistance to victims in crisis through safety planning, emotional support and/or immediate connections to emergency services through our network of trained service provider and law enforcement partners.

Download the informational flyer ▸

We offer a Job vetting service, so that potential human trafficking situations could be prevented. The service is free of charge. We have well-trained specialists, who check whether the company or agency that offers the job is in the official registers and in our Hotline’s database. We do research about the employer by their names, mobile numbers or by any other information we have. We look for opinions from ex-workers in online forums and in social media. At the end of each Job vetting, we make a risk assessment to evaluate whether the job offer is potentially risky.

Based on this assessment, which comprises objective and detailed research on the company data, we make a formal statement on whether it is or not risky to accept the job offer.

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FAQ's


Do you want to inquire about 0800222777, or human trafficking? Click below to view our FAQ. Contact us if you have additional questions.

Download the flyer ▸

 


ANYONE


Past callers have included:

– Victims of human trafficking

– Social service providers

– Medical professionals

– Government employees

– Educators and students

– Anyone who comes into contact with a potential victim

– Friends and family members of victims

– Law enforcement

– Legal professionals

– Public prosecutors, lawyers, judges

– Community members

The South African National Human Trafficking Hotline is available to answer all urgent calls from anywhere in the country, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year. For informational calls please call within general office hours.

Yes. The caller can choose to stay anonymous, in compliance with the South African National Human Trafficking Hotline’s Confidentiality Policy. The NHTH strives to abide by the highest ethical standards. Calls received by the NHTH are anonymous unless the caller chooses to provide the NHTH with his or her name and contact information and authorizes its use. This information is not given to law enforcement, other individuals, or other agencies without prior consent. In limited circumstances, we may be required to inform certain authorities if we suspect child abuse, have reason to believe the caller may harm his/her self or others, or if we are required by law. In other circumstances, where a caller prefers to remain anonymous, his/her privacy will be protected while the information they have conveyed about a situation of human trafficking will be shared with appropriate authorities.

After receiving a tip, the National Human Trafficking Hotline team jointly conducts a thorough internal review process to determine appropriate next steps. Crisis calls and urgent tips receive immediate follow-up. Before reporting, the NHTH will consider the needs and stated preferences of the caller as a primary consideration.

Additional considerations include: the specificity of the information provided, the presence of indicators of severe forms of trafficking in persons, the involvement of minors, and the anti-trafficking services and law enforcement available in the caller’s area. The preferences, when known, of the potential victims involved will also be taken as a primary consideration.

Follow-up may involve any of the following actions:

An additional call to the caller to confirm the accuracy of information (with the caller’s consent); Provision of materials and/or referrals to organisations in the caller’s area serving trafficking victims; A report to a local anti-trafficking organisation, service provider, or law enforcement.

The NHTH is equipped to handle calls in all languages. The NHTH has English operators. The NHTH is also able to connect to a tele-interpreting service with access to 186 languages, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week through a tele-interpreting service.

The NHTH is a nationally-focused line in South Africa. However we do receive international tips and can process them in a limited capacity. When available, the NHTH can provide referrals to South African-based and international organizations that handle international trafficking tips and inquiries. In some cases, the NHTH may report the tips directly to international law enforcement agencies. For international tips about situations of human trafficking occurring in South Africa, please call us at: 0800 222 777.

If you or someone you know has information on a potential trafficking situation, call us at 0800 222 777. Call us for materials and resources to generate awareness in your community. Help us publicize 0800 222 777 by posting the number in your community or organisation.

To add your organisation to our database, call the hotline at 0800 222 777 and tell us about the services you provide and the populations you serve. The NHTH is looking for organisations that provide a variety of services and resources to assist trafficking victims, including the following:

– Shelter

– Immigration Assistance

– Counseling

– Awareness Initiatives

– Job Opportunities

– Legal Assistance

– Transportation Assistance

– Referrals

– Training/Education

 

 

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Can You See Me?


Can You See Me? is a global campaign purposed to equip the general public on recognising indicators of human trafficking and reporting suspected scenarios.

    

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Sex Trafficking

Learn More

Click Out to Can You See Me: Sex Trafficking Scenario 

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Child Labour Trafficking

Learn More

Click Out to Can You See Me: Child Labour Trafficking Scenario 

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The real life scenarios depicted through Can You See Me? campaign attempt to bring awareness of the millions of men, women, and children who are currently trapped in slavery across the world. By partnering with law enforcement, governments, businesses, and NGOs, our goal is to turn awareness into action.
 

 

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Social Media

FB: @satraffickinghotline
IG: @satraffickinghotline
 

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Email Us

info@0800222777.org.za

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(c) 2024
 

This Human Trafficking Hotline is operated by A21, a global counter-human trafficking non-governmental organization.

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